BECOME AN RAF
A
PPRENTICE (Brat)

It has taken successive governments 43 years to reduce this country to its' present state. If it takes a further 43 years to build it back up again I shall be 103 years of age and perhaps 'pushing up daisies'. Although 'we' are continually told that we are in a boom period and unemployment continues to fall, I do not recall ever seeing an advertisement such as the one below. This was gleaned from a 1929 edition of The Model Engineer and Light Machinery Review.



July 18, 1929.                                                    The Model Engineer and Light Machinery Review.                                             Page 55

600 VACANCIES FOR AIRCRAFT APPRENTICES

    Six hundred apprentices, between the ages of 15 and 17, are required by the Royal Air Force for entry into the schools of Technical Training at Halton, Bucks, and at Cranwell, Sleaford, Lincs. They will be enlisted as the result of an open competition and of a limited competition which will be held in the near future by the Civil Service Commissioners and the Air Ministry respectively. Successful candidates will be required to complete a period of twelve years regular Air Force service from the age of eighteen, in addition to the training period. At the age of thirty they may return to civil life or maybe permitted to re-engage to complete time for a pension.

    The scheme offers a good opportunity to well educated boys of obtaining a three years' apprentice course of a high standard and of following an interesting technical career. Already over 5000 aircraft apprentices have completed their training at the technical schools of the Air Force, and the annual output is approximately one thousand fully-trained aircraftmen.

     The principal trades open to boys are metal rigger, a new trade brought into existance by the introduction of the metal aeroplane, which involves training in both in fitting and sheet-metal work, fitter (aero engine), fitter(driver, petrol), fitter (armourer), coppersmith and metal-worker, wireless operator-mechanic and electrician. The apprentices are given a thorough training in the trade by highly qualified technical instructors and their general education is also carried on simultaneously by a staff of graduate teachers.

     Full information regarding the dates of the respective examinations, the methods of entry and the aircraft apprentice scheme genrally can be obtained if early application is made to the Royal Air Force, Gwydyr House, Whitehall, London, S.W.1.